Skip to content

Spotlight On Aircraft Warning Lights

June 2, 2009

Moflash Homepage

SOAWL

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Moflash recently introduced it’s range of obstruction marking beacons , the range consists of low medium and high intensity options all conform to the ICAO Regulations covering from 10cd up to 2400cd and 20,000 on high output white flash . (see below)

Aircraft warning lights are lighting devices that are attached to tall structures and used as collision avoidance measures. Such devices make the structure much more visible to passing aircraft and are usually used at night, although in some countries they are used in the daytime also. These lights need to be of sufficient brightness in order to be visible for miles around the structure.

WHY DO I NEED AIRCRAFT WARNING LIGHTS?

In compliance with The Air Navigation Order 2005, Article 133, any high rise obstacle that can be of hazard to aircraft should be marked with obstruction lighting. With the increase of technological developments, the use of high rise structures has vastly increased.

These lights can generally be found attached to any tall structure such as broadcast masts and towers, water tanks located on high elevation, electricity pylons, chimneys, tall buildings, cranes and wind turbines. Shorter structures that are located close to airports may also require lighting.

Lights are usually arranged in clusters around the structure at specific heights above the ground. Frequently there will be a set at the top, and then one or more sets equally spaced down the structure.

awl

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: